Radburn - A Planned Community

Radburn, a planned community, was started in 1929 by the City Housing Corporation from the plans developed by Clarence Stein and Henry Wright. The concept of the "new town" grew out of the older planned communities in Europe and the work of Ebenezer Howard and Patrick Geddes. The intent was to build a community which made provisions for the complexities of modern life, while still providing the amenities of open space, community service and economic viability.

The community was intended to be a self-sufficient entity, with residential, commercial and industrial areas each supplementing the needs of others. All property within the boundaries of the Radburn Association is governed by The Declaration of Restrictions which runs with the land.

Radburn - A Planned Community

Springtime in Radburn

Tulips in bloom along the tunnel from A park to B park

Radburn as a Landmark

In 1974, the Radburn Association site was included in the National Register of Historic Places and the New Jersey State Register.  In 2005, Radburn was designated a National Historic Landmark.

The residential areas include every type of housing unit with a wide range of cost. The basic layout of the community introduced the "super-block" concept, cul-de-sac (cluster) grouping, interior parklands, and separation of vehicular and pedestrian traffic to promote safety. Every home was planned with access to park walks.

Radburn as a Landmark

Radburn Sign

The Radburn sign on Daly Field

Recreation

There are extensive recreation programs planned for the entire community. While the orientation is primarily toward children, there is also a full range of adult activities. Some of the programs are: Tot Lot, Radburn Pre-school, sports, aerobics, amateur dramatics, library, clubroom facilities.

Recreation

The Plaza Building

The Plaza Building, looking from the current site of the Railyard Cafe, c 1930